Saint Chapelle’s – a Medieval Masterpiece

Have you ever been to a place that was so amazing you just had to share?  Here’s one.

John and I were fortunate enough to  attend a concert  here as the sun set on these ancient stained glass windows.  Read about it here.

Advertisements

Library Lady’s Favorite Books of 2018

I’ve been doing a lot of travel writing lately but feel it’s time to get back to my roots and write  some book reviews!  I’m lucky enough to be a book-lover who works at a library, so have plenty of opportunities to learn about great reads. As many of you ask me for book recommendations, here’s some of my favorites for 2018.

Fiction Books

bird

Dear Mrs. Bird – A.J. Pearce

Set in London during WWII this book is about an adventurous young woman who takes a job as a war correspondent, or so she thinks, but when the dust settles, she finds herself working as an advice columnist for a women’s magazine. Emmaline can’t resist answering letters that her boss has deemed unfit, and so the fun begins.  Warm and funny, an eye opening look at life during the bombing of England.

gentlemanA Gentleman in Moscow – Amor Towles

The Author takes us to Russia in 1922, where the aristocratic Count Alexander Rostov, has been condemned to death by a Bolshevik tribunal. Thanks to his popularity and social prominence his life is spared, but the count is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol Hotel for the rest of his life. As he adjusts to his new circumstances, we get to know this witty and elegant gentleman and the profound effect  he has on those around him. (One of my favorites!)

indigoIndigo Girl – Natasha Boyd

Set in the 1700’s, this is the story of Eliza Lucas Pinckney, a young Southern woman who must run her father’s plantation when he is called away.  To save the family from ruin, Eliza decides to grow Indigo, an unheard-of crop for that area.  With help from the plantation workers she attempts this risky endeavor, but not everyone is on her side. Based on a true story. “Reader’s Choice” winner for Salt Lake County Libraries.

Continue reading

Rosie Bear Retires

PENTAX Image
Rosie Bear

As many of you know, this blog originated in 2013 as “The Library Lady and Rosie Bear”.  While I wrote adult book reviews and web content, my lifelong friend and teddy bear Rosie, focused on children’s book reviews  and acted as adviser on all things blog related.

At this time, I am sad to announce Rosie’s  retirement. At the age of 61, she feels it is time to explore her options.  I can’t wait to see what fun plans this adventurous brown bear has in mind. Rosie’s parting words? “Read till your eye falls off.” Excellent advice for all.

As for the blog, it will  continue without her (bearly) and in the future will  be known as The Library Lady Writes.  For a humorous look at the world in general, travel tips and whatever else crosses my mind, please continue to read and follow.  I’m grateful for those who have been with me all these years, and hope to continue our acquaintance. Best to all!

Don’t Do This!

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMy mother and I recently enjoyed a long-awaited tour of  Ireland. All in all it was a delightful trip, as long as you don’t count the part where I was held hostage in the Shannon airport. I have no one to blame for this international incident but myself . . . well actually, I could blame my mother.  She’s the one who put one name on my birth certificate then called me something entirely different for the rest of my life.  As a result, I don’t think in terms of my given name, unless I’m applying for something official like a driver’s license.

This was my first mistake – putting my Christian name on my driver’s license. It seemed like the thing to do at the time but has caused me untold amounts of trouble over the years since the name on my license never matches anything else.  My second mistake was in putting my nickname on my airline tickets. Continue reading

One Hundred Thousand Welcomes!

By Geanie Roake

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATraveling from Chicago’s O’Hare airport to its miniature equivalent in Shannon Ireland is like stepping into another dimension. While the two airports are polar opposites – finely tuned chaos compared to small-town bustle – it’s the shift in scenery that takes your breath away. Chicago, a major metropolis of towering concrete, percolates with honking horns and harried people. Ireland on the other hand, embodies peace and lush green beauty.

County Clare 

Our ten-day bus tour of Southern Ireland began in the rural area of County Clare, where the countryside is dotted with traditional cottages, lush valleys, and ancient stone buildings. There are over 300 hundred castles, or the remains of such, in County Clare alone. It’s not unusual to see a country farmhouse sitting a stone’s throw from a crumbling 12th century cathedral, the farmer’s cows grazing peacefully among the
ruins.  Continue reading

Escape from O’Hare – or the Long Layover

 

1199px-O'Hare_airport_Terminal_1_Concourse_CChicago’s O’Hare airport is an interesting place, but not for seven hours.  My mother and I came to this conclusion ten minutes into our long layover there.  We were en-route to Shannon Ireland, and while not excited about our down time, we were also uneasy about leaving the airport. What if we got lost or mugged, and didn’t make it back in time to catch our flight?   But the alternative of playing solitaire and wandering aimlessly for seven hours was unthinkable.  We decided to throw caution to the wind and set out for the City of Chicago.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Millennium Park

Our first stop was the tourist information booth at the airport.  We asked the attendant what she would do in our situation and without hesitation she said, “Go to Millennium Park”.  It sounded good to us, and best of all, it was easy.  We got on the blue line and stayed put until we reached Forest Park, (a 35 to 40-minute ride).

Continue reading

Promoting Your Freelance Writing Business Face to Face

492034302-170x170

Tell Them What You Do!

Well, that was embarrassing.  I shake my head as I contemplate my failed attempt at describing my writing business. I had just bumped into a long-lost friend at the mall and she asked what I what I was doing these days.

“I’m a freelance writer,” I replied with confidence.
“Really, so what do you write?”
Here’s where I dropped the ball.  “I um, write articles . . . and blog posts.”
“Oh,” she said. “What’s a blog?” (I know; my friend needs to get out more.)

Don’t Miss Opportunities

Luckily, in this case, my lackluster response wasn’t a big deal, but it could have been. What if my acquaintance had been a potential employer, or the friend of someone who was looking for a freelancer. I’d have missed the boat. Here’s the thing about being a writer – word of mouth is important. And that day, my mouth wasn’t working.

So why did I stumble over my job description? Because I usually rely on my resume – that perfectly choreographed depiction of my best writing self.  Ideally, I don’t have to describe what I do, I simply link potential clients to my website, and shining examples of my craft pop up on the screen.

Unfortunately, we can’t always rely on a remote interaction, or a written version of our abilities. Occasionally, even in this high-tech world, we need to talk to real people and promote ourselves face to face. Fortunately, this is not as frightening as it sounds if you give it some thought ahead of time. Continue reading